Space, Place, and Hunting Patterns among Indigenous Peoples of the Guyanese Rupununi Region

Hunting is a key livelihood activity for the indigenous communities of the Rupununi region of Guyana. This paper describes hunting practices (often with bow and arrow) and hunting patterns, showing that distance from the community, mediated by landscape features such as hills and watercourses, are key factors in determining where hunters go. The study also mapped the distribution of spiritual sites, identified by elders, toshaos (community leaders) and shamans, comparing these with kill sites. Many of these sites are associated with local myths, and certain behaviours are proscribed in these places. The study found that hunters do avoid these areas, which could have particular conservation value as source sites, helping sustain wildlife populations. The authors therefore argue that researchers and managers should take account of both the environmental and cultural / spiritual contexts when considering natural resource managment.

This paper is from researchers of Project Fauna, a community-based monitoring project described in more detail in this case study.

Author(s) 
J. M. Read, J. M. V. Fragoso, K. M. Silvius J. Luzar (2010) Space, Place, and Hunting Patterns among Indigenous Peoples of the Guyanese Rupununi Region. Journal of Latin American Geography, Vol 9:3, pp. 213-243
Year 
2010
Resource type 
Journal articles
Monitoring Theme/s 
International Forest Agenda/s