Technological leap-frogging in the Congo Basin, Pygmies and Global Positioning Systems in Central Africa: what has happened and where is it going?

This report describes the historical context that has given rise to the phenomenon of many Pygmy hunter-gatherers in the Congo Basin, using handheld computers attached to global positioning systems (GPS), even though they are unable to read or write. It provides a survey of the different uses that Pygmies are putting the GPS to in Cameroon, Republic of Congo, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo and Gabon and discusses the reasons for this sudden technological engagement and the factors that have made it possible.  It finds that the maps being produced are enabling indigenous communities to demarcate community forests and record their resources, and have resulted in the rapid integration of local concerns into management practices.

Resources 
Author(s) 
Lewis, J. (2012). Technological Leap-Frogging in the Congo Basin, Pygmies and Global Positioning Systems in Central Africa: What has happened and where is it going? African Study Monographs, Suppl. 43: 15−44, March 2012
Year 
2012
Resource type 
Journal articles
Monitoring Theme/s 
International Forest Agenda/s